YA Book Review - Golden by Jessi Kirby

goldenWhy is it whenever there is a there is a  choice between stability and freedom, the traditional and the unexpected, it is always the arty, let's do the crazy option that is always chosen? How many romances have you read where the choice of future mate comes down to stable, buttoned down businessman/woman and the long-haired free spirit artist/carpenter/bartender? Who is chosen every time? The free-spirit. Why is it when the choice is between responsibility and irresponsibility, the latter always wins out and is, as a result, trumpeted as the way to true happiness? If I had to posit a theory, I'd guess the authors of these books are people who chose the responsible path and have regretted it. Who think their life is boring and OMG wouldn't it be so much better to be an struggling artist living above a shop with few possessions and even fewer expectations from others? Or, maybe they were pushed into a path they didn't really want to take and resented it. Whatever the case, contemporary fiction is littered with these stories and they all end the same. (If you know of one that ends with the main character choosing responsibility, please let me know.)

We can thank Harry Potter, Twilight and The Hunger Games for the current trend of adults devouring YA and New Adult novels. But, not all YA/NA crosses over well. Golden (★★) is firmly targeted to teens, with hardly a parent or adult being represented. The one parent that is given a few pages is overbearing and controlling. Of course. I can't imagine any adult, let alone a parent, even less a parent of a teenager who are constantly trying to teach our teens about responsibility and taking charge of their future would like Golden very much. But, teens will eat the message up with a spoon. The message being, as far as I can tell, that 1) a parent that wants the best for you is wrong and 2) making spur of the moment decisions that will negatively impact your future is okay as long as you have a hot snowboarder boyfriend you can fall back on.

Hey, I get it. I'm definitely not the target audience for this book. And, I don't think all YA, New Adult or whatever you want to call it, should have a message that is "parental approved." But, to have a "message" book that so clearly disregards both perspectives - the adult responsible one and the YA impulsive one - does a disservice to the target audience. In Golden, the author didn't do a good enough job of showing why the MC's decision was the right one. As a result, Golden will be one of those books that teens love but, when they revisit it as adults, they will wonder what the hell they were thinking.