Red John is dead. Long live The Mentalist.

the mentalist tunneyWell, thank God that's over. When I learned the first six episodes of season six would deal exclusively with resolving the Red John storyline, I assumed I would be posting weekly episode recaps. Then, the episodes aired and I found I had nothing to say. Kirkland was on his own vigilante quest? Shrug. Red John has a tattoo of three dots on his left shoulder? A pretty stupid tattoo for a serial killer who is supposed to be extremely intelligent. The Blake Association? Sounds like a homeowner's association. Bertram is Red John? I'm supposed to believe Michael Gaston has the charisma to inspire such rapturous, love-like devotion of Lorelei, Rebecca and all the other acolytes who have done Red John's bidding for so many years?

Turns out, no, I'm not. The Mentalist couldn't resolve the storyline without one last feint, without trying desperately to illustrate Red John's superior planning and intelligence. Sheriff Macalister is Red John. A character who resonated with absolutely no one, ever.

You know what? I'm not going to pick apart this resolution. Other people are doing it for me. I'm just thrilled The Mentalist is no longer saddled with overarching storyline. The original idea was good, great even. But, the execution was sloppy because it dragged on for too many years and probably because Heller didn't have a clear idea who Red John was until a couple of years ago. Maybe if the Big Bad had been fully formed, the overarching story would have been, too.

But, it wasn't and now it's over. Good riddance. The Mentalist becomes what it should have been after the end of season three - a straight up crime procedural. CBS does these shows very well so there is no reason why The Mentalist shouldn't keep chugging along for a few more seasons. As a long-time, dedicated fan, one who has flirted with abandoning the show but has stuck around despite major issues, I hope Heller and Company take this reboot - which is exactly what this is though no one has said the word - and make the show better. To do that, they need to do one thing, and one thing only:

Make the law enforcement professionals competent.

It has always been my biggest complaint that Lisbon, Cho and company couldn't investigate their way out of a paper bag. They went through the motions and did the legwork, but it was always Jane who "solved" the crime. I get it; the show is called the mentalist. But, sometimes I wondered why the others were there at all. It seemed Lisbon's sole purpose was to apologize for Jane's actions, threaten him with consequences, but still let him do whatever he wanted. This was perfectly illustrated in "Red John" when she half-heartedly tried to talk Jane out of meeting Red John, gave Jane her gun(!), then gave Jane her car. Jane fulfilled his vow to kill Red John. Lisbon rolled over and failed to keep her promise of stopping Jane. The worst part was she didn't even try. It is very nearly a complete betrayal of the character. I wonder how they will redeem her, or if they will brush Lisbon's failure under the rug and instead focus on Jane's new life. For Lisbon, her failure to stop Jane should have very nearly the same effect on her psyche as Jane's causing his family's death did on his. But, I'm guessing it won't. Why? Two reasons. One, this show struggles when it doesn't focus on Jane. Two, it is easier to explain it away with feelings. The romantic in me would dig a good love story. The part of me that wants Lisbon to be a strong, independent female character would be pretty pissed.

I hope the new iteration of The Mentalist has a better balance of competence. I hope they give Lisbon the backbone they imply she has. I hope it takes longer than one episode for them to pull the team back together. I hope Jane feels the consequences of killing MacAlister for longer than one episode. I hope the new people they bring in aren't just Ribsby and Van Pelt clones. I hope they expand the world beyond CBI and give the characters a life, friends and family outside of work. I hope Heller has talked with Robert and Michelle King, the creators and showrunners of The Good Wife, on how to write a procedural with rich characters and a rich world that is just as interesting outside of the case of the week as it is inside.